The Information Proletariat and Globalization – Hookes

The Information Proletariat and Globalization – Hookes

Submitted for the International Conference:

The Working Class: What is it and where is it?

At the Economics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences
Moscow, 11-12 July 2006

Introduction: The fetishisation of manual labour

It is generally recognised that the character of work has changed considerably during
the 20th Century. The classical Marxist proletariat, manual factory workers, from
being the overwhelming majority, say, 70-80 % of the workforce, are now between
10-20% in advanced capitalist countries. Those members of the workforce who
provide services, especially information processing and delivery services, are now the
majority.1 A sub-group of the ‘information proletariat’ are sometimes called
‘knowledge workers’, that is,  those who jobs require high level of knowledge input
obtained from advanced schooling. They are now about one third of the workforce in
the US, more than twice as numerous as the manual factory proletariat. They are
expected to become at least 40% of the working population, say by, 2010. [1] This
latter group can be considered to be the new core proletariat of a knowledge-based
society. It contains many highly privileged groups such as university teachers and
researchers, and so on, whose level of alienation is, let us say, tolerable, as well as
less privileged technical knowledge workers.  The information proletariat as a whole
includes many highly exploited workers such as those in call-centres and data-input
offices.

See the complete article here:

http://www.labortech.net/pdf/Moscow3.pdf

Plan for a Global Industrial Union

The future is global unionism
23 September 2010

Union workers across the globe need to find new innovative ways of working together to match the increasing global power of multinational corporations, AWU
National Secretary, Paul Howes, said at a meeting in Germany this week. Continue reading

Global Unionism – Leitch

http://newunionism.wordpress.com/2010/05/06/global-unionism-which-way-forward/

Global Unionism – which way forward?

Looking at the example of unionism in Mexico, Richard Leitch discusses different approaches to building union internationalism.

My recent review of ‘Global Unions, Global Business’ by Croucher and Cotton [on the newunionism site – pw] raised a couple of concerns about the authors’ preferred perspective of ‘regional minilateralism’. These revolved around its applicability to all areas of the global economy, and whether or not the alternative approach (which they call ‘rank and file bilateralism’) has some purchase for international trade unionism. Here I want to expand on these points, and look in particular at the example of building independent trade unionism in Mexico. Continue reading

ITUC and Israel – Irving

International labor report’s omissions reveal pro-Israel bias
Sarah Irving, The Electronic Intifada, 23 July 2010


Every June, the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) releases its Annual Survey of Violations of Trade Union Rights. According to a press release that accompanied the 2010 publication (which reports on events in 2009), “the Middle East remains among the regions of the world where union rights are least protected.” The report describes repression meted out to Palestinian workers and trade unionists by both the Israeli authorities and the Palestinian factions. But ITUC’s omissions and brevity both disguise the complexity of life for Palestinian workers, and reveal some of the union confederation’s own biases. Continue reading

Dockworkers Respond to Flotilla Massacre – Dropkin

CounterPunch                                                                                                              July 13, 2010

Blockade!

Dockworkers, Worldwide, Respond to Israel’s Flotilla Massacre and Gaza Siege

By Greg DropkinThree weeks after the massacre on the Freedom Flotilla, ILWU dockworkers in the San Francisco Bay area delayed an Israeli Zim Lines ship for 24 hours, the Swedish Dockworkers Union began a week-long blockade of Israeli ships and containers, dockers in the Port of Cochin, India, refused to handle Israeli cargo, and the Turkish dockworkers union Liman-Is announced their members would refuse to service any Israeli shipping. In South Africa, Durban dockers had already boycotted a Zim Lines ship in response to the invasion of Gaza last year. On the 5th Anniversary of the United Palestinian Call for Boycott Divestment and Sanctions, Israel faces the prospect of targetted industrial action to implement boycotts. How did it happen, what does it mean, and how can the solidarity movement respond to the new opening? Continue reading

El Nuevo Internacionalismo – Seoane y Taddei

En noviembre de 1999 la “Batalla de Seattle” contra la tercera reunión ministerial
de la Organización Mundial de Comercio (OMC, bautizada “Ronda del
Milenio”) marcó el “acta fundacional” del movimiento altermundialista. Hoy,
una década después de su “bautismo de fuego” en la escena internacional, este
movimiento enfrenta la salida impulsada por los poderes sistémicos a la actual
crisis capitalista que amenaza con profundizar los efectos y tendencias confrontados
diez años atrás. Continue reading

US Social Forum a Mechanism for Change – Becker

U.S. Social Forum a Mechanism for Change

Written by Marc Becker
Tuesday, 29 June 2010
http://upsidedownworld.org/main/international-archives-60/2571-us-social-forum-a-mechanism-for-change

Fifteen thousand social movement activists descended on Detroit during the fourth week of June for the second United States Social Forum (USSF) to discuss and debate proposals for how to build a better world. The slogan for the forum added “Another Detroit is happening” to the previous USSF slogan “Another US is necessary” and the standard World Social Forum (WSF) insistence that “Another world is possible.” Continue reading